Skip to main content

Champion

 • 

7.3K Messages

 • 

253.7K Points

Mon, Jul 16, 2018 1:33 PM

Live Poll: Movies Which Were Hard to Finish

Can you name a movie that you tried to watch, but you turned it off (or walked out) because you did not like it? One or two per person.

List: https://www.imdb.com/list/ls022895606/
Poll: https://www.imdb.com/poll/sHGMEmQ_KN4/

Responses

6.2K Messages

 • 

154K Points

2 years ago

I don't think I can remember the name of any of the movies I've declined to watch to the end. It is as if they were meant to be forgotten by me. Ha.

Champion

 • 

4.2K Messages

 • 

91.1K Points

2 years ago

Pibby, if I don't like a film that I am watching, I start fast forwarding it but never left a film.

Can I suggest two names that I found too much irritating?

Champion

 • 

7.3K Messages

 • 

253.7K Points

Yes, I guess I can include them.

Champion

 • 

4.2K Messages

 • 

91.1K Points

My 2 nominations:

Festen 
Stalker

There are many films that I didn't enjoyed, but I am suggesting particularly these two because these two are critically acclaimed.

534 Messages

 • 

18.1K Points

When I tried to watch 'Stalker' for the first time about a year ago, I couldn't watch it for at least 20 minutes. But I watched it again last month. And have rewatched 3 times since. :D

2.3K Messages

 • 

72.8K Points

2 years ago

There are only two films I was unable to finish as I always get to the end of what I watch even if I'm not loving it.

One of them was Scary Movie, which I find totally distasteful and after seeing it was not funny at all after five minutes it just went worst and worst and I just stopped.

The other was Pulp Fiction, I couldn't stand the way it showed violence to be something funny, I totally dislike Tarantino for that, and this was my first experience with him, I have finished other of his movies now that I know what to expect, but I have never liked any and 5 is the highest I have rated one of his films.

795 Messages

 • 

29.7K Points

I love the way he does violence be comic, I think that's what makes it so exciting to watch his movies. 
But I understand who doesn't like, it's about tastes and we need to respect that.

534 Messages

 • 

18.1K Points

I loved both of these movies. Loved scary movie because of the way it parodies horror movies. (horror is my least favourite movie type)
And QT's movies. That's another story. :)

795 Messages

 • 

29.7K Points

Yeah, it's another story... :D

2K Messages

 • 

47K Points

2 years ago

Agree with DC, not sure I've ever stopped watching but would definitely fast forward or go on my phone or something. My most excruciating film experience has to be Les Misérables (2012).

I could NOT get through that.. didn't expect near 3 hours of singing from people who could not sing. Totally took me out of the story like 10 minutes in and when I realized it was entirely singing.. jesus.

Champion

 • 

13.4K Messages

 • 

412.1K Points

2 years ago

Peter,

I make a point of watching any film I start watching until the end, even when I determine that it is not watching. On occasion I stop watching a film when the film is broadcast or on cable and I have a prior time commitment.

For your consideration:
Leonard Part 6 (1987)
I determined that this film was awful after seeing an extremely annoying ad campaign. I watched the film on cable while on a business trip. I probably would have been unable to watch all of the film if it were not for the commercials the mercifully interrupted a film much worse than the ads led me to believe. (I rated this 1/10)

C.H.U.D. (1984)
I saw this on broadcast television. I only continued to watch it because I thought to myself that it couldn't possibly get worse. It did. Commercial breaks made it possible for me to continue to watch this film. (I rated this 1/10)

6.2K Messages

 • 

154K Points

832 Messages

 • 

29.3K Points

2 years ago

I never walked out of cinema but sometimes fast forwarding its the best option if I watch movies on my laptop, but I can really remember all of them.
1. The Legend of Hercules (2014) I gave 1 rating for the movie
2. Piranha 3DD (2012)
3. Fifty Shades Darker (2017)
4. Chappie (2015)

Are you going to make a list for TV too? Because I have some of series that I stop in the middle of season or the first few episodes...

795 Messages

 • 

29.7K Points

Chappie was pretty annoying to watch but i finished.

by the way, how can i link the titles of the movies?

Champion

 • 

7.3K Messages

 • 

253.7K Points

I’m not planning a TV version.

Champion

 • 

7.3K Messages

 • 

253.7K Points

Seventh, when you write a post here there is link icon in the text formatting options, but only if you use a desktop computer. You can also copy-paste a link from IMDb or another site.

795 Messages

 • 

29.7K Points

Oh, Thanks now i know how to do it.

Champion

 • 

4.3K Messages

 • 

88.6K Points

2 years ago

I have very very rarely done this. The only one I can think of is Nashville, which I'm sure no one else will agree with...

2K Messages

 • 

47K Points

Jen, I didn't get the hype of Nashville; maybe because it was an era I wasn't born into but I've liked countless period films that were just better. Wasn't into it either.

Champion

 • 

4.3K Messages

 • 

88.6K Points

I've liked several other Altman movies and tons of films from the '70s, so I'm not sure where the problem is. I even like the Keith Carradine song!

4.2K Messages

 • 

126.2K Points

If you missed the ending, you missed everything, the last 10 minutes are incredible, just give it a second chance, I had a hard time watching it the first time, the second went much easier and when I was done, I decided to watch it a third time.

Speaking of generations, Kyle, it's not a matter of age or anything but it's funny you say that, I was referring to that in my review (no spoilers)

When Baby-Boomers were Millennials...
My rendezvous with "Nashville" goes back to seven years ago, I could get any movie I wanted but "Nashville" resisted. I needed to see the fifth Best Picture nominee of 1975, this very movie Roger Ebert and Pauline Kael raved about, that topped both Ebert and Siskel's annual top ten, this American Film Institute's Top 100 entry that was a total mystery to me.
It took seven years but better late than never… At first, I didn't get what was so brilliant about it but so many story lines and only one viewing? I saw it again. And then, I went like "oh, what the heck", a third time won't hurt. Three times in less than four days, could have been four or five times, as many as the stars in the American flag, that's how good it is. This is one flew over a cuckoo's nest you don't recover from, and the more ordinary people and situations are, the more extraordinary the journey is. Altman should be damned… if he wasn't such a genius.
The film spans a period of five days during a country-music festival, coinciding with some populist politician's party rally, this is enough to have a panoramic view across the lives of dozens of characters who, through their considerable differences, reach ever possible dimension of the American spirit of 1975, and in such a way that I guess even a non-American can enjoy it. Well, there's me at least.
So, what is "Nashville"? Simply, the Mecca of country music, the reason why everybody came in the first place and were reunited by the end.There are dozens of them but there's no small part in the sense that they're all equally small in the scale of the significance of music, the common thread, the real star. Some sing, some wish they could, some manage or look for singers, some screw or get screwed by them… or just pop up and aimlessly wander, like in real life, no one crosses your path who should necessarily has a significance.
I wonder to which extent these fascinating hazards were part of Joan Tewkesbury's script or improvised by the actors… the same way they wrote their own songs.
And not any songs, country songs… this is crucial because country music isn't just deeply rooted in American tradition, it is also the most cinematic of all forms of music: it tells stories.
I can perhaps tell you the name of four or five country singers but I know a great deal about the way country music affects me, because any song I hear finds a powerful echo in my own memories. It is like this scene from "The Simpsons" where Homer leaves the house after an argument and hears Lurleen Lumpkin singing "Your wife doesn't understand you but I do". You listen to country music because you feel like 'it' has listened to you in the first place.
Just compare the upbeat patriotic starting song from Haven Hamilton (Henry Gibson) "we must have done something right to last 200 years" with the neutral political slogans the loudspeaker keep on hammering all day, which one will reach the hearts first? Compare the obnoxiousness of the character played by Keith Carradine who seemed to have gotten half the female cast on his bed with the melancholic tune of his "I'm Easy" you can't even tell whether he has pride or contempt toward himself, but the gaze of Lilly Tomlin while listening to him says everything.
Music is like the only way to arouse genuine emotions, in another powerful scene, a wannabe singer (Glew Welels) of mediocre talent gets booed, she can only indulge to a striptease to provoke the cheers. In another scene, a father doesn't even have the patience to listen to his deaf son's story as if silence was the antithesis of communication, and music its apotheosis.
Many people communicate, others don't… some meet, others don't… I remember a girl in high school, we never talked together, never went in the same class, but for some reason, we always met in some place or another. When it became obviously repetitive, we smiled at each other; like a private joke. Just like in "Nashville", the more we meet these people, the more we care for them, as we care for ourselves.
Only the New Hollywood period could have made this gem possible, a time where America was still mourning an innocence and where the baby-boomers like today's millennials (count me among them) were cherishing their childhood, a time without the Vietnam War, incarnated by a Wizard-of-Oz-like childhood, Kennedy's dashing smile, the very American Pie Don McLean said bye-bye to.
And this end-of-an-era is magnificently captured by the performance of Roney Blakely (Oscar-nominated along with Tolmin) as a fragile and emotionally vulnerable country singer named Barbara Jean. She's a sweet and delicate flower with a ticking bomb of a heart, she faints at her arrival, in her first representation, she interrupts her songs to mumble about her childhood until her husband (Allen Garfield) takes her away, simply overwhelmed, and easily upset like a part of America is.
But there's room for every possible identification: capitalists, disillusioned soldiers, drifters, lunatic, has-beens, romantics and losers, this is a microcosm of America, all in characters and emotions, for the sake of laughs, anger, tears, frustration, the spirit of a country in a nutshell and its heart is Barbara Jean, whose "Idaho Home" song awakened again that symptomatic feeling of millennials: being nostalgic over eras we didn't live.
And if I could keep one image from these 240 minutes, I'd keep the sight of the American flag gently rippling under the wind while Barbara Jean sings "we were young then, we were together. We could bear floods and fire and bad weather", hell, how can I seriously write a thousand-word review when this image alone speaks for a thousand words.
I don't know why the three dots disappeared in the new IMDb format, these blank spaces look awful.

6.2K Messages

 • 

154K Points

What?

4.2K Messages

 • 

126.2K Points

Old IMDb format: Blahblahblah... blah.
New IMDb format: Blahblahblah   blah.

Champion

 • 

6K Messages

 • 

175.5K Points

2 years ago

I've never walked out of a theater but just last night I stopped watching a film at home when it was only about thirty minutes in: Baby Driver. I know it got good reviews and was very popular but it just seemed like a mix between a bad Tarantinto rip-off and a mediocre, all-too-slick music video. I may have just been in a bad mood so I might give it another chance but, as of now, that's the only feature film I can remember not seeing through. 

Champion

 • 

4.3K Messages

 • 

88.6K Points

I liked it very much. Perhaps you'll try again in a few years and make it through. :)

Champion

 • 

6K Messages

 • 

175.5K Points

I plan on trying it again soon, actually. I suspect it may have been that I was just not in the mood for it that night.

Champion

 • 

7.3K Messages

 • 

253.7K Points

2 years ago

838 Messages

 • 

26.2K Points

2 years ago

Dragonball: Evolution: fills me with rage every time I think about it. There is no coherent story what so ever. I would try to say more but after 4 attempts I have yet to get past the 45 min mark and there was no redeemable qualities up to that point.

Napoleon Dynamite: Just couldn't never find the interest in the style; I found it dull and the overall comedy a miss.

838 Messages

 • 

26.2K Points

*could never 

Champion

 • 

7.3K Messages

 • 

253.7K Points

Yes, sometimes a little “n’t” can be significant.