bradley_kent's profile

876 Messages

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18K Points

Sat, Mar 7, 2020 4:19 PM

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Subjective Sexist Keywords

I anticipate that this will get "kickback" (ready, Ed Jones and other anti-metooers?), but sexist keywords should be unacceptable, especially since they are often synonyms for other acceptable and more prolific keywords.  

Please eliminate: "boobs," "jugs," "tits" as keywords.

Please eliminate such extremely  subjective keywords as "creamy-legs," "desirable-legs," "exquisite-legs," "hot-legs," "pretty-legs," sexy-legs," "slender-legs," "slim-legs," "thin-legs," etc.  Even "legs-to die-for."  (And NONE of these appear in any title with Betty Grable, who probably had the most famous legs in film history!)

Please eliminate such keywords as "babe" (with the understandable exception of "babe-scientist"), "chick" (unless it refers to a small, young bird-the-animal), "hottie," etc.

Most of these are references to people of the female gender.  There are, of course, some that refer to people of the male gender that should be equally unacceptable, i.e. "dick," "prick," etc. instead of "penis."

Resisters may long for "the good old days," but, especially in this "Harvey Weinstein" time, we need to be more cognizant of reality.  Until someone invents a real time machine, there is probably no other way to go back to the past.  We must live in the now and anticipate the future.

P.S. Do "creamy-legs" and "creamy-thighs" refer to skin tone or ejaculate?

2.1K Messages

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65.1K Points

Il y a 2 y

Pretty much agree with Bradley. But I believe IMDb kinda turns the blind eye when it comes to stuff like that. But then again the whole keyword section is a bit confusing to me since almost everything is accepted. So perhaps I just don’t ”get it”.

Similar thing with the Parental Guide, which often serves to a guide to find ”naked people” or scenes in movies. It kinda works in two ways: ”Beware, naked people!” Or ”Yummy. Naked people”.

876 Messages

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18K Points

Il y a 2 y

And here's one that is as bad as "legs-to-die-for": "nature's-gift-to-man"!

Come on, IMDb, act on this.  I submit deletions (which are accepted), and THEN they are reestablished!

I think there are only a few contributors causing this problem (including one who particularly seems to like Japanese schoolgirl films).

I don't mean to generalize, but they seem to come from an immature, stereotyped teenage boy attitude.  It's time to grow up.

576 Messages

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11.2K Points

Il y a 2 y

Hi Bradley,

Thanks for your message.

What you're asking for is a fairly substantial change to our policy so it isn't something I can just say "Yes I agree and we're adding X to the banned keywords list". This thread has started an internal dialogue on our keywords policy, which we will update you on when a decision is made.

However I will caution that I cannot give you any schedules or timeframes for when our decision will be made so I can only ask for your patience at this time.

Regards,

Grayson

876 Messages

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18K Points

Il y a 2 y

Thank you for the response.  It seems very reasonable.  Thanks.

876 Messages

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18K Points

Il y a 2 y

There may also be one or two technical issues involved with this problem.

As these keywords are deleted, they then reappear, almost instaneously.

Also, when entering a keyword search, some of the titles listed as having a keyword DO NOT, in fact, have that particular keyword in their keyword list.  Example: "creamy-legs" lists such titles as 
 
 Ocean's Eight (2018)

 Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets(2017)

 Road House (1989)

but their keyword lists DO NOT include that particular keyword.

Curious.


P.S. Other titles where this has often happened include Mean Girls (2004) and It's a Disaster (2012)

876 Messages

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18K Points

Il y a 2 y

Thankfully, "f##" and "n##" are NOT keywords, but why were "lesbo" and "dyke" acceptable?

Possibly the worst keyword emerging from this inquiry: "filthy-slut."

Oh, and there's also "harlot" and "wench" (very archaic) and "fluzzy" (apparently a misspelling of "floozy").

Misogyny seems rampant here. 

576 Messages

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11.2K Points

Il y a 2 y

Hey Bradley,

Thanks again for your responses.

We're still looking into this and I expect we may be for some time. You may notice I've edited your post to remove the words that we have already banned as keywords. I realise you put them in your post to make a point, but they're banned from IMDb so they're also banned from Get Satisfaction. I've left the other keywords so that they can be added to our investigation.

I would also say that you should consider that IMDb also lists adult titles, where keywords that might seem inappropriate can be very useful for the fans of those titles.

Regards,

Grayson

876 Messages

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18K Points

Il y a 2 y

I understand.  It seems, however, that Adult titles should follow the same guidelines when it comes to such sexist concerns.  "boobs," for example, should not be an acceptable keyword for Adult titles any more than it should not be acceptable for non-Adult titles.  To me, this is not about censorship, but about objectivity. That "##," however, may need to be used own some other words.

876 Messages

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18K Points

Il y a 2 y

Another aspect of this problem:

I suspect that these keywords are being added and re-added by just a few contributors (or staffers?).  Can those people somehow be contacted to be made aware of this problem (and this discussion)?

Here are two titles, for example, where keywords under discussion were added or re-added just today:

 Hotori no Sakuko (2013)

  Playboy: Sex on the Beach (1997 Video)


876 Messages

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18K Points

You know nothing about my grandkids.

177 Messages

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8.1K Points

Il y a 2 y

While I agree with what you propose, I don't agree with your reason.

The keywords you mentioned in your original post should definitely be disallowed, because they are personal, or subjective as you say, not informative. "legs to die for" is no different than "oooh baby come to papa". It has no place on imdb.

On the other hand, if we start banning words just because they are (at the moment) sexist, or nasty, or tsk tsk words, where will it stop? The word "beautiful" may be considered sexist in 5 years. "Black man" may be considered racist in 5 years. Or even 5 days.

I'm sure even ordinary stuff like "fire" will be offensive to someone. There'll be some loser who'll want his 15 minutes and go "When I was a kid I was afraid of fires, and now I saw that ugly word on imdb. I'm traumatized."

People want to be offended, they're looking for ways to get offended, it must be the greatest satisfaction to feel victimized for these people. So let's keep the imdb out of it.

876 Messages

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18K Points

Il y a 2 y

To me, this is not about censorship, or "banning" certain words. BUT...

It is about the need to be objective rather than subjective.  Personal opinions, yours and mine, should not be expressed in keywords.  (Leave that to reviews.)

Every stand-alone "adjective" is a suspect keyword.  (I know there are reasonable exceptions.) Such questionable keywords can be interpreted as an individual opinion or evaluation or criticism of a title rather than a verifiable, corroborative and reportable aspect of the title..  What, for example, might be "inspirational" to one person may be "repulsive" to the next.

Adjectives are like ice cream.  There are so many different flavors, and we all have our personal favorite(s).

876 Messages

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18K Points

Il y a 2 y

And here's another unbelievable keyword: "sight-for-sore-eyes"!

Cmon, IMDb! Act on this!  It can't be that hard, can it?

876 Messages

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18K Points

Shouldn't such instances be under "Quotes" rather than "Keywords"?

224 Messages

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11.4K Points

Quotes are not searchable inside the database.
https://www.imdb.com/search/title-text/?quotes=sight+for+sore+eyes

Accessed via the Advanced Search link in the topbar...


2.1K Messages

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65.1K Points

Il y a 2 y

I personally don’t fully understand how ”sight-for-sore-eyes" could be a keyword. I mean if these type of cases are accepted (and I believe they are), pretty much everything goes.

And I’m not even talking about issues like ”sexism” here. Point is that the keyword should be something like ”airplane” or ”aircraft”, not ”fancy-airplane-in-the-sky”, ”airplanes-in-formation” or ”action-movie-on-a-airplane”.

But again I’m first to admit it that I don’t probably get it.

333 Messages

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13K Points

Il y a 2 y

If female breasts are called "tits" in a movie, it's perfectly fine there is such a keyword. Same is true for all the other terms listed on here. If not, then vulgar terms can be excluded I guess.

As for the non-vulgar terms:
Honestly, every time I told a woman she has desirable legs, hot legs etc. she took it as a compliment. If you link them to Weinstein (and make the wrong conclusion that every positive comment on female physicality is a way of sexism or discrimination) and/or a desire to masturbate or generally see those as sexually motivated references, then that would be entirely your problem, Mr. Kent. That is about as accurate as saying "dead bod" should be omitted because many women think it's hot. The only perspective from which I could see removing them would make sense is that, as you say in the title, they are mostly subjective, but from this perspective we could also remove stuff like "pink hat" because some people could see it as magenta or even purple.

In short, as far as I am concerned, this is a perfect example of political correctness in the wrong spot: Leave all the way it is. Don't remove anything. Mind over matter. But I think i said this before when the OP created this exact same topic on another occasion before. No clue why he did again. It's the same nonsense and that becomes inevitably clear when he sets "thin legs" equal to "prick", which by the way can also be a term to call a person. And if Amon Göth is called a prick in the keywords, I am all for it.

Warm regards and stay healthy everybody.
Horst

876 Messages

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18K Points

Il y a 2 y

Wishing you the best, Ed. OVID-19 cases in California have doubled in three days to over 1,000.  I live in Mid-Manhattan (germ central) in a state that has more cases than any other.  And I, also, am medically compromised. (My doctor insists that I wear a surgical mask when I go outside, although I, personally and subjectively, don't think it has any effect. I still wear the mask.)

So...

I think people are having a "semantic" -- a "knee-jerk" -- reaction to the words "sexism" and "politically correct," when my main point is that keywords should be objective and not duplicative.  I do not believe in censorship for adults when it comes to films, TV, video, etc., except for snuff-films (and the like), although I do think parents have the right to determine, as much as they can, what their children are exposed to.

But, keywords should be void of a contributor's personal evaluations or feelings. "desirable," "sexy," "thin," "legs-to-die-for," etc. are ALL subjective evaluations.  

And, keywords should not be synonyms for keywords that already exist and have set a precedent (unless that precedent changes, for some reason). For years, I have been advocating a Keyword Cross Reference Index that could help curtail such duplications.  Keywords have very low priority, however, so such a guide will probably never happen.

Also, I think that any sentient person must be aware of the changing times.  What was once acceptable may no longer he acceptable.  What is acceptable tomorrow may not be what is acceptable today.  I recently saw the 1933 King Kong with the 14-year-old son of friends of mine, and all he could talk about was how racist that film is.  One can reject change, if one wants, but that does not negate the change.  (Is the earth flat? Does gravity exist?  Does one plus one equal two?)

IMDb is the one that makes this final judgment.  They, for example, do not accept the f-word or the n-word as keywords, even though those words may be in a title's dialogue.  It is their right to do that. This is their website.  They are the final arbiter.

876 Messages

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18K Points

Arts and Science are not completely separate from each other.  Sinful?  Come on.