Mattheogstdwz's profile

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Sunday, September 10th, 2023 3:09 PM

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IMDb miscalculates ratings.

How can it be that both episodes are clearly rated worse than the others. No matter how you look at it, the two 9.9 episodes are always rated worse than the 9.7 star episode. The 9.7 episode even has 8% more on 10 stars votes and 7% less on 1 star.

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9 months ago

6 Messages

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@Col_Needham​ I already looked there before posting, if you compare the pictures you can see straight away that the 9.7 star episode is rated better than the two 9.9 episodes.

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@Mattheogstdwz​ From the above FAQ:

How do you calculate the IMDb rating displayed on a title page?

We take all the individual ratings cast by IMDb registered users and use them to calculate a single rating. We don't use the arithmetic mean (i.e. the sum of all votes divided by the number of votes), although we do display the mean and average votes on the votes breakdown page; instead the rating displayed on a title's page is a weighted average. To display the detailed votes breakdown, click the number of votes located directly below the average IMDb user rating. For an example, see the User rating breakdown for Inside Out.

The IMDb weighted average does not change upon receipt of each new vote, but instead is updated numerous times per day.

A TV series rating is not the weighted average of the ratings of individual episodes. Instead, customers vote separately for the rating of the series as a whole via each title's series page.

Hope this helps.

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110 Points

I know about the unweighted average, does he just decide for himself what rating the episode gets, or do you add something else to it? Even if you take out the 1 ratings, the 9.7 episode would still be rated better. And if you take out the 1 ratings,
A 2 rating is worse for the overall value than a 1 rating. which makes no sense.