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Saturday, September 10th, 2022 10:08 PM

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Duplicate Keywords - List #34 (Proposals for Permanent Merger and Auto-Conversion) (physical disability keywords)

Here is the next installment of my lists of proposed keywords for permanent merger and auto-conversion.

I am posting this for fellow contributors to review first and raise any objections or questions. I will wait at least 14 days before changing this post to a "problem" post and asking IMDb staff to make the proposed changes.

The mergers and auto-conversions should be made in the direction of the arrows.

Duplicate Keywords Proposed for Permanent Merging and Auto-Conversion

cripple (5 titles)   -->  physically-handicapped-person (14 titles)  -->  physically-challenged-person (8 titles)  -->   physically-disabled-person (0 titles)   -->  person-with-a-physical-disability (41 titles)

crippled (0 titles)  -->  physically-handicapped (22 titles)  -->  physical-handicap (13 titles)    -->  physically-handicaped (2 titles)   -->  physically-challenged (14 titles)  -->  physical-disability (107 titles)

crippled-dog (2 titles)  -->  handicapped-dog (2 titles)  -->  dog-with-a-physical-disability (1 title)

crippled-father (3 titles)  -->  father-with-a-physical-disability  [new keyword]


crippled-girl (12 titles)  -->  girl-with-a-physical-disability (8 titles)


crippled-man (6 titles)  -->  lame-man (4 titles)  -->  physically-handicapped-man (9 titles)  -->  physically-disabled-man (6 titles)  -->  physically-challenged-man (29 titles)  --> man-with-a-physical-disability (20 titles)

crippled-woman (1 title)  -->  lame-woman (4 titles)  -->  physically-handicapped-woman (4 titles)  -->  physically-disabled-woman (2 titles)  -->  physically-challenged-woman (10 titles)  -->   woman-with-a-physical-disability (11 titles)


fake-cripple (14 titles) -->  pretending-to-be-crippled (4 titles)  -->  pretending-to-be-lame (3 titles)  -->  faking-a-physical-disability (2 titles)

physically-challenged-boy (5 titles)  -->  physically-disabled-boy (1 title)  -->  lame-boy (1 title)  -->  boy-with-a-physical-disability (4 titles)

wheelchair-bound (157 titles)  -->   bound-to-a-wheelchair (1 title)  -->  wheelchair-user  [new keyword]

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A few notes about this list. First, the list originated from this thread and includes contributions from @s_h_3zmjad9id0o6c, @bradley_kent, @gromit82, and @Michelle.

Second, I found these guides helpful in crafting keywords related to disabilities:

ADA National Network: Guidelines for Writing About People With Disabilities

National Disability Authority:  Appropriate Terms to Use

In general, the guides say that we should "refer to the person first and the disability second":

People with disabilities are, first and foremost, people.  Labeling a person equates the person with a condition and can be disrespectful and dehumanizing. A person isn’t a disability, condition or diagnosis; a person has a disability, condition or diagnosis. This is called Person-First Language.

Second, this list does not include general disability keywords such as "disabled" and "handicapped." Instead, this list focuses specifically on physical disability keywords. I will address the general disability keywords in a future list. The general keywords are broader than this list because they may involve either a physical or a mental disability. Many of the mental disability keywords were previously addressed as part of the mental health keywords. (At some point in the future I will also consolidate and post the intellectual disability keywords and probably the developmental disability keywords too, plus the "disturbed" keywords, which are a subset of the mental health keywords that I previously missed.)

Third, some of the items on this list do not follow my general rule of thumb to only list keywords (or sets of multiple keywords) that total 50 titles or more. As with the mental health and mental disability keywords,  I feel it's important to have uniformity and consistency across these sets of related keywords as a whole, so I have included a few keywords with less than 50 titles as an exception to my normal rule. Another important factor is that IMDb staff have already weighed in that the "cripple" keywords are inappropriate.

And finally, this list includes proposed auto-conversions of a couple keywords ("crippled" and "physically-disabled-person") that don't currently exist on IMDb. Although these keywords don't currently exist, I have frequently seen both of them in the past. If these keywords are not set up for auto-conversions, they will undoubtedly continue to be re-created in the future. It's better to be proactive and set these keywords up for auto-conversions.

Accepted Solution

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2 years ago

Hi @keyword_expert -

All merged and auto-converted.

Cheers!

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@Bethanny​ Thank you! This was before the 14-day comment period ran, but I think this was my fault because I accidentally created this post as a "problem" post rather than an "idea" post. I doubt these keyword changes will be controversial, so little damage done here.

Employee

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@keyword_expert​ Woops, let's hope there is no problem, I will fix them if any.

Thanks!

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2 years ago

If you are attempting to be politically correct, there are some hits-and-misses here.

"cripple"is a no-no

any variations of "disability" or "handicap" are also no-nos.

"physically-challenged" is most politically correct.

And, when it comes to questions of mental health, "mentally-challenged" wold be the most politically correct.

Re "wheelchair":  "wheelchair- bound" is a terrible keyword, just as "man-in-a-wheelchair," "woman-in-a-wheelchair," etc. are bad.  "man-uses-a-wheelchair," "woman-uses-a-wheelchair," etc. iare more appropriate, so "wheelchair-user" would be the more general term.

(edited)

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@bradley_kent said:

"physically-challenged" is most politically correct.

I respectfully disagree, and I am basing my opinion on the guides I have consulted and linked to in this post. 

Here is what I said a while back on the earlier thread:

The word "challenged" should not be used in this context.

ADA National Network: Guidelines for Writing About People With Disabilities

Terms like differently-abledchallengedhandi-capable or special are often considered condescending

(edited)

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@bradley_kent​ said:

any variations of "disability" or "handicap" are also no-nos.

There is nothing wrong with the word "disability." It is a preferred word, according to the guides I have referenced in my post.

What matters is how the word is used. Instead of referring to someone as a "disabled person," the person should be referred to as a "person with a disability." And it is fine to use the word "disability" to refer to their disability.

ADA National Network: Guidelines for Writing About People With Disabilities

National Disability Authority:  Appropriate Terms to Use

In general, the guides say that we should "refer to the person first and the disability second":

People with disabilities are, first and foremost, people.  Labeling a person equates the person with a condition and can be disrespectful and dehumanizing. A person isn’t a disability, condition or diagnosis; a person has a disability, condition or diagnosis. This is called Person-First Language.

(edited)

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@bradley_kent​ 

And, when it comes to questions of mental health, "mentally-challenged" wold be the most politically correct.

I also disagree with this proposition. As with "physically challenged," "mentally challenged" is very condescending -- almost as condescending as "slow." 

Besides, "mentally challenged" is vague. Is it referring to a mental illness, a mental disability, a learning disability, or an intellectual disability? 

If by "mentally challenged" you mean what some people would say "mentally retarded," the preferred term nowadays is "intellectual disability." All of the "intellectual disability" keywords will be the subject of a future proposal for keyword cleanups.

(edited)

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@bradley_kent​ 

Finally, one additional problem with the keyword "physically-challenged" is that it is too close to the keyword "physical-challenge."

physical-challenge (10 titles)

physically-challenged (14 titles)

On the surface, either of these keywords could refer to a character confronting a physical challenge that has nothing to do with a physical disability, like a stamina or endurance test. 

But again, the major problem with referring to people with disabilities as being "challenged" is that this language is frequently regarded as offensive and demeaning.

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@bradley_kent

I should also point out another inherent problem with the "mentally-challenged" keyword (other than the fact that is often perceived as demeaning and offensive) is that some contributors use it to indicate someone who may have a low I.Q. but is not necessarily intellectually disabled (what has often historically been called mentally retarded). 

For example, one top contributor likes to add the idiosyncratic keyword "mentally-challenged-sidekick," when what he probably means is "bumbling-sidekick."

Other contributors apparently use "mentally-challenged" when what they really mean is a learning disability, like dyslexia.

Still others use "mentally-challenged" for developmental disabilities that aren't necessarily intellectual disabilities, like autism.

Thus, the keyword "mentally-challenged" is facially vague, because it has many distinct potential meanings:

(1) an intellectual disability (e.g., Down syndrome),

(2) a developmental disability (e.g., autism),

(3) a learning disability (e.g., dyslexia),

(4) a mental illness (e.g., bipolar disorder),

(5) someone with a below average I.Q., 

(6) someone who is temporarily impaired, for example someone whose drink is drugged without their knowledge, thus "challenging" their mental faculties, and

(7) a mental disability that does not fit into any of the other categories, like post-traumatic stress disorder. 

I believe most uses of "mentally-challenged" on IMDb fit into category #1 (especially when "mentally-challenged" is used as a prefix, like "mentally-challenged-man"). With that said, I believe the specific keyword "mentally-challenged" itself has sometimes been used for each of the other categories (or at the very least, categories 1 through 5).

It is a similar story with the former keyword "mentally-impaired" (which no longer exists after some auditing). The keyword "mentally-impaired" is facially vague.  A very drunk person is "mentally impaired," -- at least, temporarily. And so are people with permanent mental disabilities, intellectual disabilities, and mental illnesses.

Just like the keyword "mentally-impaired," the keyword "mentally-challenged" should be audited and phased out of use. 

(edited)