Marco's profile

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64.9K Points

Fri, May 7, 2021 4:58 PM

Colo(u)r keywords

Most of the keywords with the word colo(u)r in it are spelled the American way: https://www.imdb.com/find?s=kw&q=color . However, there are also quite some keywords where the word is spelled the British way: https://www.imdb.com/find?s=kw&q=colour . Is it possible for a staffer to merge them and create a block for either color or colour so this problem won't get any bigger in the future?

Responses

751 Messages

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13.8K Points

2 m ago

I agree.

Block all Americanisms.

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64.9K Points

@daniel_francis_gardecki Well, currently, color is attached to 257 titles and colour to 11...

FWIW, I started this thread because I want them to be merged and one of them blocked for the future, not because I favo(u)r either British English or American English.

589 Messages

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14.8K Points

It's been the long-standing IMDb policy that the American English spellings are preferred, apparently because there are the most users of the website in the USA. And, although mostly physically located in Bristol, England, IMDb is owned by Amazon, which is mostly located in the USA.

(edited)

Employee

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10.5K Messages

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241.4K Points

2 m ago

Hi Marco -

 

The existing keywords "Colour" have now been merged into "Color", the change should be live on the site shortly.

 

I have also taken further steps to block the British spelling in the contribution form for future submissions (no offense, our site preference is American English).

 

Cheers!

Champion

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61.1K Points

Can we do so for the editorial department occupation "colourist"?

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13.8K Points

@Michelle I take "offence" at all Americanisms, and people like Marco, Bradley and Adrian trying to force the minority Americanism language on the rest of the English speaking world.

It's one of the reasons why I don't edit Wikipedia as much as I used to, and one of many reasons why I quit trying to correct British topics on the quickly deteriorating Quora a couple of years ago, as Americans are constantly forcing Americanisms into articles and topics which aren't specific to North America.

Wikipedia claim they "will use whatever language/spelling/style is the majority" in other words "the most common" as they usually say, unless it's specific to a particular country like a British TV show, yet they don't even do that most of the time.

For example, around a month ago I added the British title to a Wikipedia article for a film which is directed by a Brit, produced by a Brit, and is a British-American co-production, where 3 of the production companies listed are British, and 4 of the production companies listed are American. There might be more production companies, which haven't been added to Wikipedia or IMDB yet, who knows?

Plus the filming locations and the cast seem to be split pretty evenly between the UK and the USA too.

My British title addition was quickly removed by an American who said "it isn't necessary," yet it clearly is, as it's not a sole American production.

I quickly reverted him pointing the above facts out, and it hasn't been changed since.

It's bad enough having a British-American film article written entirely in American, along with the American poster for the film, as like I've hinted at above the USA always takes priority on Wikipedia with British-American co-productions, even when they have little to do with them most of the time, but to remove the British title from the article for the film which is roughly 50% British is just taking the biscuit.

Col Needham, and other Brits at big companies around the world, should try to slow down the growing trend of websites trying to force everyone to use incorrect English, by making it optional based on the subject matter, like Wikipedia "claim" they do.

(edited)

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183.4K Points

I see no merit in doing anything special with "colorist" and "colourist", as the idea is to make sure IMDb's data matches what appears on screen.

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64.9K Points

@daniel_francis_gardecki  "people like Marco, Bradley and Adrian trying to force the minority Americanism language on the rest of the English speaking world."

This is a pretty bold statement. Do you have any evidence to back up your statement? I have stated in my OP "create a block for either color or colour". Where am I trying to force American English on the rest of the English speaking world? Also, you overestimate me quite a bit if you think I can influence "the rest of the English speaking world".

Don't get me wrong, I appreciate your passion when it comes to language (I wish more people were passionate about language), but it doesn't help your case if you state things about specific people that simply aren't true.

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I interpreted "trying to force" to mean "standing by and letting the influence proceed uninhibited", as it is clear to me that the extreme (and exaggerated) wording reflects a tantrum against those who are largely indifferent. Haha.

For those who many be interested, there is actually a set of rather involved origin stories concerning how there came to be two standards for the spellings of English words. One part of particular interest to me is the fact that the Constitution of the United States most certainly conforms to British spelling, but outside of that document in its original form, government documents in the United States just about all are written with American spelling. Several constitutional amendments have such spelling. In some ways, it feels like push toward American spelling was just to spite Alexander Hamilton or something, perhaps the Constitution, but how can that make sense? Maybe it was just more convenient at the time and thereafter. To be honest, the United States have drifted very far from their founding principles, ever since basically George Washington retired from federal public office. For one thing, initially there was a Department of War. The originating statute titled it honestly, but then a little over century afterward, it was retitled into the more euphemistic "Department of Defense" (not even "Department of Defence") when it was merged with the Department of the Navy.

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@Michelle "The existing keywords "Colour" have now been merged into "Color", the change should be live on the site shortly."

Thanks for merging 'colour' into 'color', but I was actually hoping that all keywords with 'colour'/'color' could be merged. Is this possible please?

(edited)

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5.5K Points

@Michelle Sort of related question... the keywords under 'cause' and 'attribute' etc... can duplicates be combined? For example liver cirrhosis and Liver cirrhosis? Liver Disease and liver disease? There are a TON like this. Plus misspellings as well. I''d love to help clean this up. If I start a list and periodically send it to someone would that be helpful? I know it's not top priority. Also... is there a way to keyword search for Covid deaths? I notice the number associated with that term is rising at an unfortunately high rate. Just curious.

Examples:

Place

 
New York, USA (400) 
New York City, New York, USA (1,283)
New York City, New York (3)
New York City, NY, USA (1)
New York City, USA (5)
New York, New York, USA (301)
New York City, New York, USA (1)
La Spezia (1)
La Spezia, Italy (2)
La Spezia, Liguria, Italy (8)
Leningrad, RSFSR, USSR (76)
Leningrad, RSFSR, USSR {now St. Petersburg, Russia] (62)
Leningrad, Russia (1)
Leningrad, Russia, USSR (13)
Leningrad, Russia, SFSR, USSR (12)
Leningrad, Russian, SFSR, USSR [now Russia] (1)
Leningrad, Russian, SFSR, USSR [now St. Petersburg, Russia] (9)
Leningrad, Soviet Union (2)
Leningrad, Soviet Union (now Saint Petersburg, Russia) (4)
Leningrad, Soviet Union (now St. Petersburg, Russia) (2)
Leningrad, USSR (39)
Leningrad, USSR [now St. Petersburg, Russia] (7)
Leningrad, USSR [now Saint Petersburg, Russia] (2)
Saint Petersburg, Russia (18)
Saint Petersburg, Russia Empire (5)
Saint Petersburg, Russia Empire [now Russia] (8)
Philadelphia, PA, USA (1)
Philadelphia, USA (3)
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania USA (2)
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA (484)
Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, USA (1)
Lincoln, England, UK (1)
Lincoln, Lincolnshire, England, UK (16)
London (35)
London, UK (18)
London City, England, UK (2)
London, England (15)
London, England, Great Britain, UK (1)
London, England, UK (1,162)
London, England, United Kingdom (5)
London, Greater London, England, UK (10)
London, Greater England, UK (1)
UK (345) and England, UK (417)  
Long Beach, New York, USA (1)
Long Beach,Long Island, New York, USA (1)
Long Branch, New Jersey (1)
Long Branch, New Jersey. USA (9)
Los ANgeles (1)
Los Angeles Ca (1)
Los Angeles County, California, USA (245)
Los Angeles, CA, USA (6)
Los Angeles, California, USA (2,066)
los angeles, California, USA (1)
Los Angeles, Califoórnia, EUA (1)
Los Angeles, USA (1)
California (18)
California, USA (492)
California, USA (undisclosed) (2)
Chilba, Japan (52)
Chilba. Japan (1)
Chicago (4)
chicago ILL (4)
Chicago Illinois (1)
Chicago Illinois, USA (2)
Chicago, Illinois, USA (842)
Chicago; Illinois, USA (1)
Chicago, Illinois, USA, (1)
Chicago, USA (6)
U.S.A. (4)
USA (1,985)
US (1)
Budapest, Hungary (1,388)
Budapest (3)
Budapest, Austria-Hungary [now Hungary] (163)
Paris (15)
Paris France (2)
Paris, France (1,116)
Cause
homicide (760)
murder (72)
Murdered (1)
murdered (150)
murder victim of the Sandy Hook Elementary School massacre (2)
murder victim of the SandyHook Elementary School massacre (1)
murder suicide (3)
murder-suicide (1)
murdered by beating (2)
murder by beating (2)
murder by beating (2)
murder by gunshot (13)
murdered by gunshot (41)
murder by stabbing (3)
murdered by stabbing (17)
Myeloma (1)
myeloma (6)
motorbike accident (8)
Motorcycle accident (1)
motorcycle accident (123)
Motorcycle crash (1)
motorcycle crash (11)
motorcycle accident, hit by a truck (1)
Myocradial infarct (2)
myocardial infarction (80)
snake bite (3)
snakebite (1)
Sepsis (1)
sepsis (39)
septic infection (2)

(edited)

8K Messages

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183.4K Points

That bit about item attributes is another problem that definitely needs to be addressed, and it is even harder to deal with than keywords because contributors are not provided a way to find out which specific title pages or specific name pages bear the data items having a parenthetical note formed by a common word, term, phrase or string. Perhaps a new thread ought to be created about that problem, as we're otherwise focused on a specific keyword synonym here.

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1.5K Points

@Marco I see that @Michelle has not yet responded to this follow-up post of yours:

Thanks for merging 'colour' into 'color', but I was actually hoping that all keywords with 'colour'/'color' could be merged. Is this possible please?

Does anyone know if it's possible for IMDB staff to permanently merge certain words and phrases contained within all existing and future keywords in favor of other words and phrases?

As applied here, is it possible to simply permanently merge all occurrences of "colour" contained within all existing and future keywords in favor of "color?"

If so, that would certainly solve existing problems, and prevent future problems, like this:

color-in-episode-title (817 titles)
colour-in-episode-title (542 titles)

However, it may not make sense to do this with "colour" specifically, because the word "colour" can be part of longer proper names, such as the bands Living Colour and Ocean Colour Scene.

But if it is possible to do this type of "perma-merging," it might make sense to use that method to solve other keyword problems involving systemic keyword discrepancies (e.g., "mustache" vs. "moustache," "sulfur" vs. "sulphur," "airplane" vs. "aeroplane," "dialogue" vs. "dialog"). Each one of those words is used within multiple other keywords on IMDb.

Mainly I am just curious to know if the "perma-merging" method is even possible. Does anyone know?

Even if it wouldn't work for any British vs. American spelling discrepancies, it might make sense to use this method in other contexts, such as commonly misspelled words (e.g., people frequently misspell "athlete" as "athelete," "camouflage" as "camoflage," etc.).

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p.s. I noticed this part of @Michelle's post:

I have also taken further steps to block the British spelling in the contribution form for future submissions

At least according to that statement, it is possible to block certain words and phrases from "future submissions" (which may or may not include new keywords).

With that said,  despite what Michelle said about "colour," that spelling does not appear to be currently blocked. I tested this and was able to create a new keyword containing the word "colour." 

Either a block was placed on "colour" and it was later reversed, or no block was ever made in the first place.

Finally, there is no need to broadly block "colour" anyway, because as I mentioned earlier, keywords should be allowed to contain the spelling "colour" in certain circumstances, such as if "colour" is part of a proper name.

751 Messages

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13.8K Points

2 m ago

North Americans have movies.

Everyone else outside North America have films.

North Americans have movies theaters or so they claim, as roughly 50% of the chains in the USA are named cinemas.

Everyone else outside North America have cinemas.

North Americans have theaters.

Everyone else outside of North America have theatres.

North Americans have programs.

Everyone else outside North America have programmes.

North Americans have licenses.

Everyone else outside North America have licences.

North Americans have re-recording mixers.

Everyone else outside North America have dubbing mixers.

North Americans have colorists.

Everyone else outside North America have colourists.

Etc etc.

Yes there will be a few exceptions, especially with countries like Australia, New Zealand and Japan, but the fact remains that most of the world use British English.

(edited)

Champion

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2.1K Messages

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61.1K Points

As Michele stated earlier, the preference is for American English (this is an American website), so there is literally no reason to have colourist as a separate position from colorist, just as there is no reason to have colour as a separate keyword from color.

Why you would take offense at this is beyond me? If this were a British website, I'd have no problem with British English being the standard.

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@adrian It is a British website, created by a Brit in Col Needham!

I take "offence" at Americans thinking they run the world, forcing their language onto people who don't use it, and changing things which don't need to be changed just for the sake of it, not only by changing the spelling of words, changing the meaning of words, and creating new words to replace the words whose definitions they changed, but also by doing things like renaming films, TV shows, songs, books, games, foods, brands etc for no reason.

Most Americans are clueless to practically everything outside of the USA, so why should they be in charge of a global website?

(edited)

Champion

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It may have started that way but IMDb is incorporated in Seattle and is owned by Amazon, another American company. I don't know what to tell you. No one is saying that "Americans rule the world".

You do realize that everything you said replies to nations other than American. Are you equally offended by those things?

I'm guessing a lot of the contributors are American. Standardization is needed. There is absolutely no reason to have multiple spelling variations of common words and terms. This is neither new nor novel on IMDb. British TV is still listed as "seasons" not "series". Without a standard phraseology, searching a database becomes exponentially more complex.

My request is based on IMDb itself, which has already chosen standard American English as its preferred language. The dropdown for the editorial department contains "colorist". That is the preferred term and should be used. If it said "colourist" I would not really care and use that term. But, there really isn't a reason I can think of to make separate terms because I'm sure there are people that work both in British and American productions and would have two different occupations despite doing the same job.

(edited)

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O, by the way, for everybody's information, IMDb stands for Internet Movie Database, not Internet Film Database. What might be awesome is if IMDb was known by two acronyms: IMDb and IFDb. Two sites with the same underlying platform and data, but with a slightly different "skin" or shell.

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14.8K Points

Wow!  I am not trying to force anything on anyone.  It was IMDb's decision LONG AGO to use American English, not mine, nor any other contributor's.  Although I am a Yank, I am also an Anglophile.  Lived in Bath for a year, and have been to London many times.  If fact, if I could live in England, I would!