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3 Messages

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90 Points

Thu, Oct 14, 2021 1:23 PM

boxoffice-'Openning"

I have met some confusion when using box office. For exemple, in the data of "Tome and Jerry" (https://www.boxofficemojo.com/releasegroup/gr2803126789/?ref_=bo_ydw_table_23), it shows data of "Openning". I'm Wondering what's the meaning of 'Openning", how this data come from, and is there any relationship between "Openning" and "Gross"?

Employee

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31 Messages

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360 Points

8 d ago

Hello @skye22ever,

 

Box Office Mojo by IMDbPro receives data from a variety of sources, including film studios, distributors, sales agents, and others from around the world.

 

  • Opening:  It's the revenue from the first weekend. 

 

  • Gross: It refers to gross earnings in U.S. dollars. On average, a movie's distributor receives a little more than half of the final gross (often referred to as the "rentals") with the remainder going to the exhibitor (i.e. movie theater). The money split varies from movie to movie, but, generally, the contract favors the distributor in early weeks and shifts to the exhibitor later on.

Please visit our help pages for more information.

3 Messages

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90 Points

@Jon  Thank you so much for your help!!!

9 Messages

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200 Points

6 d ago

Movies are typically released in theaters on Fridays (some have "previews" on prior days), so the release date is when the movie "opened" in that particular territory (Domestic includes USA/Canada and then foreign territories), so "Opening B.O." refers to the revenue generated over the opening weekend in that specific territory,

"Gross" is the overall gross revenue (i.e. before splits, profit participations, etc.) generated to date by the movie in that territory.

Typically, gross revenues are split between the exhibitor (the theater chains) and the distributor usually on a sliding scale, but roughly equivalent to 50/50% split. So if a movie generates $100M total gross B.O., you can roughly assume $50M goes to the exhibitor and $50M to the distributor.

The distributor then takes its cut to pay its expenses (Marketing/P&A) and fees. Many times this can total 70% or more of the revenue.  Depending on various contractual obligations, profit participations are then paid out and the very little left for the producer (if any!) is considered his/her "net."  There are many variations of these.

3 Messages

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90 Points

@pierre_lapointe

Thank you so much for your help~