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Thu, Nov 24, 2022 7:49 PM

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PS: The Saddest Moment Ever (basically ready)

Intro:

In some movies there are unbearable sad moments which tear the heart of the audience.

Which of these Moments nearly made you cry? ... or actually made you cry?

Please tell us here.

Suggestions:

5 serious meant options for each user, maximum 2 animated per user. I surely didn't see all sad scenes in film-history, so please shortly describe the moment in a short line like in the examples. People who know the movie and it's sad scene will remember by only one line. Thank you. :D

List: The Sadest Moment Ever - IMDb

Poll: TBD

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4 days ago

The end of Old Yeller IOld Yeller dies)

The end of Brian's Song (Brian dies and also the ending narration, but the speech by Gale is also a tear jerker)

The end of Star Trek II, The Wrath of Khan (Spock dies)

The end of Star Trek III, The Search for Spock (the Enterprise is destroyed,,, don't laugh as this was deeply moving to the original Trekkies)

(edited)

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I forgot the death of Marley in Marley and Me

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@TheOldJalapenoman​ 

Could you please link images? I'll try to figure out, but it's much more easier when you guys link images for example.

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@Breumaster​ I don't know how to do that.  My son sometimes does that for me when he is here, but I won't see him until Monday or Tuesday because he is now out of town visiting other family.  Yes, I am old and a ludite and a technophobe.  I could never program a digital watch or a vcr or set the clock on my microwave.  You may make fun of me now!

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From the nineteenth century?

cinephile

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@TheOldJalapenoman​ 

I'm not sure I understand. I thought you were the old  jalapenoman on a new account. But, what you are telling us is that you are jalapenoman's father? Unless you forgot how to use links and thus make polls, I really don't get it. 

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@cinephile​ I am the same person, but I have suffered two major strokes and a minor one.  I am now bedridden.  I have lost a lot of memory and a lot of my abilities.  My typing now is basically of the two finger variety.  I also suffer from constant headaches and can't spend much consecutive time in front of the computer.  So.... yes, I have forgotten how to do links and make polls and a lot of other things.  It is very frustrating for me and I get upset at myself a lot,

cinephile

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@TheOldJalapenoman​ 

I'm sorry to hear that.

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@TheOldJalapenoman​ 

I understand that, but maybe other users who know the scenes might help us.

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@TheOldJalapenoman​ 

I figured out an image of the old yeller. I made up that option and will continue to figure out other of your options.

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4 days ago

Ghost (1990) in the end, Sam's goodbye and finally depart to Heaven.

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@mariojacobs​ 

Please link an image. Thank you.

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@mariojacobs​ 

Thank you, mario. :D

cinephile

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4 days ago

Can I have multiple scenes from a single film? If not, my picks are below. If yes, I will suggest more scenes from Les deux anglaises et le continent.

Two English Girls

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0066989/mediaviewer/rm1002949121/

But I will upload Muriel's Reaction. It is way better.

Les Deux Anglaises et le Continent (1971) - François Truffaut © MK2/Diaphana

We don't see what follows. But, she turns her head to the right to avoid Anne's glance. At the same time, the fire's reflect in her glasses disappears. It is, in my humble opinion, the greatest "shot reverse shot" in cinema's history.

The epilogue of the film is also worth mentioning. The announcement of Anne's death is also worth mentioning. The confession Muriel makes to Claude is also worth mentioning. There are several more.

Scenes from a Marriage

Saraband

Winter Light

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0057358/mediaviewer/rm3171357696/

This poll would be worthless without a Bergman image. Winter Light (from what I have seen), his most depressing film. It is also one of the most exempt from artifices. I mean it is an honest film. It deserves a spot on the list, but there are a handful of Bergman films who could claim a spot. Practically everything after his romantic comedy/melodrama is masterful.

PS: Notice how bright the lught coming from the window is. It is so bright that against the white backdrop of the forum, it looks like a piece of the image is missing. I find lighting incredibly intriguing in Winter Light (it takes a subtle yet important role).

Au revoir les enfants

The Age of Innocence

The Passion of Joan of Arc

Annette 

Zerkalo 

Au hasard Bathalzar 

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0060138/mediaviewer/rm3021502208/

Not very original I guess. Marie as a posture similar to Tomas of Winter Light. This scene always saddens and shocks me, even more so than Bathalzar's death perhaps because Marie is human and Bathalzar isn't. Talking about animals, I thought it would be a powerful statetement to include as one of my picks a picture from Georges Franju's Le sang des bêtes, but those scene are more horrific than sad.

Gladiator

The Deer Hunter

The Searchers

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0049730/mediaviewer/rm2361431297/

It is impossible not to include John Ford. I think he is the greatest American poet of Cinema. I put emphasis on American because his films discuss american identity and values so powerfully. The Searchers is in Sight and Sound's Top 10, but it seems to me that Ford has lot a lot of his previous glory among casual cinephiles. People prefer Leone to him, I think it is a grave mistake. Ford's films are deeper, subtler, he's got a better comprehension of American culture. Sergio Leone's films are perhaps equally (or more) interesting from a technical perspective, but he never has equalled John Ford on characters and storyline. Ford is less cynic, more heartfelt. People say his films are naive. Not true. It is simply is style. He sees hope, he sees community being built despite tragedies and violence, Leone only saw violence. Ethan is one of the greatest character in American cinema. I could have included Capt. Nathan from She Wore a Yellow Ribbon. But, I felt that Ethan (and the image above) was more canonical.

Les un et les autres

(edited)

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@cinephile​ Ford is my favorite director of all time.  

I would suggest this Ford film:  At the end of Mister Roberts when they learn that the Henry Ford character has died.

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@cinephile​ 

Thank you very much for your input. I know that you are very experienced with old cinematic movies, which many people of today are not. I'm half-half. I would like to wait for the image you loaded up for your pick number one to put it also on the list. I've put the other three on the list now. Please could you do me a favor and try to compact the lines a little? I tried with my own suggestions to come close to the point with as less words as I could use and I think that people will remember by keywords when they have watched the movies. Thank you, cinephile! :D

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4 days ago

@Breumaster ,

Please update the title of your list from:

The Sadest Moment Ever

To:

The Saddest Moment Ever

= = =

J-Man mentioned many sad moments that I would have also suggested. Likewise,  @cinephile​ made some great suggestions.

= = =

I found cemetery scheme at the end of Schindler's List to most tear inducing in the film.

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@Breumaster ,

For your consideration:

Bambi (1942)

When Bambi's mother dies:

Bambi (1942)

= = =

The Yearling (1946)

After the American Civil War, a rebel soldier and his wife become pioneer farmers in Florida. Their son Jody is 11 years old. Jody is allowed to keep a fawn as a pet. The boy and the deer are soon inseparable. The fawn grows quickly, and as a yearling tramples tobacco shoots and eats the newly-sprouted corn. Jody's parents force him to shoot the fawn.

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0039111/mediaviewer/rm591464704?ref_=ttmi_mi_all_sf_21

Claude Jarman Jr. in The Yearling (1946)

= = =

Penny Serenade (1941)

Roger and Julie's adopted daughter, Trina, dies of an unexpected illness towards the end of the film.

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0034012/mediaviewer/rm2611030784?ref_=ttmi_mi_all_sf_57

Cary Grant, Irene Dunne, Edgar Buchanan, and Eva Lee Kuney in Penny Serenade (1941)

(edited)

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@dan_dassow​ 

Thank you, Dan, corrected the list's title and added cinephile's picks, waiting for the upload of his  number 1.

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@dan_dassow​ 

I'll put them on the list, Dan. Great picks! I had the death of Bambi on my list, too at firs, but then I remembered of Ellie's death and it became clear that it was much more sad to me.

(edited)

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@dan_dassow​ 

Dan, I tried to compact the text of "The Yearling" somehow, but I guess I didn't succeed. Can you tell me, if it still matches the content? I have no prolem to compact content to lesser words in German, but in English it's unequal difficult to me.

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@Breumaster​ ,

1. Thank you for updating the title.

2. Thank you for adding my suggestions.

3. I apologize for being verbose for "The Yearling". Please make this edit for "The Yearling":

From:

The 11-year-old Jody was allowed by is parents to raise a abandoned fawn. Later his parents forced him to shoot the grown-up deer, because it crossed human rules.

To:

Eleven-year-old Jody was allowed by his farmer parents to raise an abandoned fawn. Later his parents forced him to shoot the grown-up deer, because it ate their crops.

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@dan_dassow​ 

Thank you, Dan. I corrected the option.

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@Breumaster​ ,

Thank you for updating the caption for "The Yearling"

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4 days ago

One of my favorite sad moment is from a 2nd World War movie, I can't remember the name now.

In the end, it is showed a brief footage of all the members of the sabotage crew who died trying to accomplish the mission (in their happy moments, all laughing).

Something like their ghosts...

Similar to the Dirty Dozen ending, but it is another film.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gRmuSx4qVnE&ab_channel=geraldryan

Perhaps @TheOldJalapenoman remembers the name of the movie... probably from the 60s

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@mariojacobs​ Sorry, but this isn't ringing any bells this morning.  Let me think on it.

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@mariojacobs​ Maybe one of the Navaronne movies?  Maybe The Heroes of Telemark?  That's all I can come up with right now.  Part of my mind is remembering the end credits of The Great Escape where it shows all of the main actors one by one, but that isn't the scene you are describing.

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@mariojacobs​ and @TheOldJalapenoman​ ,

The Guns of Navarone (1961) was my first thought.

Other possibilities:

The Devil's Brigade (1968)

  • During World War II, a special fighting unit is formed that combines a crack Canadian Army unit and a conglomeration of U.S. Army misfits who had previously served time in military jails. After an initial period of conflict between the two groups, their enmity turns to respect and friendship, and the unit is sent Italy to attempt a dangerous mission that has heretofore been considered impossible to carry out.

Where Eagles Dare (1968)

  • Several months before D-Day, the British stage a daring rescue deep inside Germany. Led by British Major Jonathan Smith (Richard Burton) and including one American, Lieutenant Morris Schaffer (Clint Eastwood), their mission is to rescue American Brigadier General George Carnaby (Robert Beatty), whose airplane was shot down over Germany. Carnaby, one of the architects of the D-Day invasion, is being held in the Schloss Adler, the Eagle's Castle, built high on a promontory and accessible only by cable car. The team successfully parachutes into Germany, but loses its radioman in the jump, and then a second member of the team within a day. Taken prisoner by the Germans, Smith's true mission is revealed.

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@dan_dassow​ 

I'm not so into old movies. I watched many of them on TV when I was <12 years, but that's long ago. If you got suggestions, please do with image-examples and short description-text. Thank you. :D

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@dan_dassow@TheOldJalapenoman thank you, now I am going on a binge of WW2 movies this week. By the way, my favorite WW2 movie is The Birdmen with Richard Basehart (Admiral Nelson - Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea).

One more sad moment: the Elephant man being harassed by the night porter and his friends.

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@mariojacobs​ The Birdment is one that I remember enjoying.  I saw it when it originally came out.

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4 days ago

Of Mice and Men (1992

George shooting Lennie.

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@mariojacobs​ 

Thank you! Can you please give me an image? The line is perfect for the option, I guess.

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4 days ago

Guido marches off to his death.

Life is Beautiful

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@riverotter​ 

What a greatly sad moment! Thank you, riverotter! :( It's on the list now.

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3 days ago

*Incendies (The moment when the letters written by Nawal Marvan to both his son and the father of his children are read)

*Dancer in the Dark (final execution scene)

*Million Dollar Baby (The moment Frankie tells Maggy the meaning of the word "mo chuisle")

*The Diving Bell and the Butterfly ( The time they spend on the beach when Jean Do's children come to visit)

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@nazmi_altintas​ 

Great, thank you. I remember slightly on all three movies and know that I cried on all three, but it's a big time ago, I saw them. The most I remember on "mo chuisle", which really was heart breaking. I still need images and the text/quotes, because I'm not always sure that the images I'd pick match the scenes. Incendies I don't remember, but I link some qualities to it and slightly remember it was sad. I shuld re-watch it.

(edited)

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@nazmi_altintas​ 

All added. Thank you.

cinephile

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3 days ago

Special mention.

The Human Condition's ending

The film has highs and lows, but its daunting 9h30 runtime isn't a low. At the middle of the 2nd film, you last see Kaji's wife, and he promises her that they will meet again. Spoiler: He never meets her again, he dies alone in the snow of Russia or Manchuria (I don't remember). After 5 hours without her on screen, you feel fuller the dead of her absence. If she had been absent for 30 min, I don't think it would have had much impact. I'm really sensible to couples being unable to reconnect, it is not without reason that I put Gladiator as an honorable mentions in my earlier post.

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0055233/mediaviewer/rm950710784

(edited)

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@cinephile​ 

The text is a little overhanging. Can you compact it a little? ... Couples being separated always is a kind of sad, the more if it is a because of one of them died. Please dramatize it in smal words. 

(edited)

cinephile

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@Breumaster​ 

My image from Two English Girls has been posted to IMDb, it will be my 4th pick (remove the Human Condition)

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0066989/mediaviewer/rm1374698241

Compact descriptions of my four picks

Two English Girls picture: Muriel is attracted to Claude, but so is her sister. She sees them happy, she doesn't want to interfere, so she turns her head. She does what does best, repressing her emotions, by doing so she also kills her passion as represented by the flame disappearing from her glasses.

Winter Light picture: Marta, the atheist, comforts priest Tomas in his crisis of faith. She doesn't care about god but has a crush on him. Like practically all Bergman women, she is very motherly.

Au Hasard Balthazar picture: Marie was stripped, beaten, probably raped, and locked in a room. There are no apparent reasons for it her treatment mirrors Bathalzar's. Both were too kind and pure for our cruel world. Both are saints.

The Searchers picture: Ethan Edwards brings Debbie home. The family is reunited and happy. But, he is excluded from that community or he excludes himself. The mistakes he made are unredeemable (according to him). 

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@cinephile​ 

Thank you, very much, cinephile. I will add the shortened descriptions.

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1 day ago

FYC:

Sophie's choice

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0084707/mediaviewer/rm1243540481

Typo:

The death of Bambi's mother.

To avoid spoilers, I would keep the descriptions short. They only have to be understood by someone who has already seen the film.

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@Peter_pbn​ 

Corrected. 

"To avoid spoilers, I would keep the descriptions short. They only have to be understood by someone who has already seen the film."

That was my intention. Not only because of hiding spoiler, but also because some people don't like to read so much. I can hide the description behind spoiler bars. Should I? Do you have a short description for the scene of 'Sophie's Choice'? Thank you, Peter. :D

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@Breumaster​ 

My description was "Sophie's choice".

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@Peter_pbn​ 

Sorry. I didn't get that right. I'll add it to the option.

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16 hours ago

The ending of Gardens of the Night was very sad but not in the strictly hopeless kind of way like countless other examples.

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@jeorj_euler​ 

Should I add it? It should be really heartbreaking. I didn't see that movie, but I count on your verdict.

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I should hope that somebody else can vouch, because I'm mainly looking at how it felt to me empathizing with the main character. Unlike a lot of the other candidates, the ending of Gardens of the Night doesn't involve a confirmed death, but rather an uncomfortable loose end that could be resolved in a day, a week, a month, a year, a decade or never.. In a way, there is more than one sad moment in the movie.

How about American History X? Have you ever seen that?

I wonder if I can think of a movie whereby the overall story isn't a tragedy but only one little piece is very tragic.

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7 hours ago

Changes the rules to five movies per user. If there aren't any new, I'd declare it as ready to go, but I'm also open for corrections and further suggestions.

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@Breumaster​ 

... And I'll put spoiler bars on the options for users who don't want to get spoiled.