Breumaster's profile

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126.9K Points

Thu, Jun 25, 2020 9:05 AM

4

PS: Movies That Deny the Question of Skin Color

Intro:

We're talking about movies that show up that the question of skin color or race fades in the contemplation of the character or characters - at least in the movies' conclusion. [b]Which of them is your favorite?[/b] (If you don't know any of them, please pick the one you are most interested in). Please tell us here.

Rules:

Just movies rated higher than 7.0/10. But as you can see on the list I worked on, I do amens on movies that are rated than 6.5/10 or higher, if the subject fits very good! No animees or animated, or documentations. Not just black/white, asians and natives welcome.

List: https://www.imdb.com/list/ls080620466/

Poll:


Responses

4.5K Messages

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130.6K Points

1 y ago

Doesn't that mean any anti-racist movie?

5.5K Messages

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126.9K Points

1 y ago

No it doesn't. It goes way far beyond. When you look at "12 Years a slave", it is a very good anti-racism movie. But I want movies, where the social environment was teached a lesson about racism. Like in "The Green Book". Where the driver learned about his guest and was a friend after. In Amistad, the courtroom learned about Mende and his people and learned respect about the strong leader and helped them to go back to their families. In 'Dances with Wolfes' Dunbar learned about the natives lifes and respect for life in general. Something like that. :D In 'Hidden Figures', the people around the "hidden figures" learned respect for the matematic geniuses. There was no further question about it.

4.4K Messages

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123.8K Points

1 y ago

Enemy Mine, because I will always go for the seemingly cheesiest option available.

5.3K Messages

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111.9K Points

1 y ago

I not sure about how this movie fits with your premise; it either the perfect or worst one for this list?
The Human Stain with ANTHONY HOPKINS and NICOLE KIDMAN.

Synopsis

The story is told by Nathan Zuckerman, a writer who lives quietly in New England, where Coleman Silk is his neighbor. Silk is a former professor and dean of faculty at nearby Athena College, a fictional institution in the Berkshires of western Massachusetts. Silk is accused of racism by two African-American students over the use of the word spooks, using the term to describe their absence from the classroom (like ghosts) rather than in the racially derogatory sense. The uproar leads to Silk's resignation. Soon after, his wife Iris dies of a stroke, which Silk feels is caused by the stress of his being forced out of the college. Silk begins a relationship with Faunia Farley, a 34-year-old local woman who works as a janitor at the college and is illiterate. Silk is criticized by feminist scholars at the college for this. It is slowly revealed through Zuckerman's musings that Silk is an African-American who has been "passing" as a Jew since a stint in the Navy. He completed graduate school, married a white woman and had four children with her. He never told his wife and children of his African-American ancestry. As Roth wrote in the novel, Silk chose "to take the future into his own hands rather than to leave it to an unenlightened society to determine his fate"


I think it is significantly underrated, I rated it an 8 and thought is should be high 6 or low 7 on IMDb, but because it was a bit controversial and didn't live up to the book got knocked down a bit.

222 Messages

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9.3K Points

1 y ago

Seems too much of white savior narratives to me.  An ironic title, then.  Might as well include The Blind SideDangerous MindsDriving Miss DaisyGran Torino and Avatar while you're at it.

5.5K Messages

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126.9K Points

1 y ago

Ready to go!