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Mon, Jul 8, 2019 12:11 PM

Poll Suggestion: The Most Crafty & Cunning Shakespeare Villain After the 80s

Intro:

In Shakespeare literature based movies, there are mostly real abyssmally bad minded villains driving the plot. So Shakespeare painted the humans world in black & white. In Shakespeare dramas prioritively is the extreme position of good and bad you can find nowerdays in many other movies made in very simpler style. But Shakespeare had a serious crush on the sense of words, which makes his dramas very unique, even nowerdays. From these Shakespeare villains, who is the most nasty? Tell me the bad deeds of your beloved Shakespeare villain here. (Also remember the heroes that turned to villains. Spoilers for non Shakesperians ahead.)

Rules:

Only Shakespeare villains from movies after 1989.
Please suggest with imagelink from the database.
sometimes there are no images in the database.
If there is no image I can't do a magic trick. ;)
Add sentence like in the examples I gave, what the villain is about.

Link:

https://www.imdb.com/list/ls048019755/

Responses

Champion

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a year ago

I did not know the word guile, but it seems to be a noun. Perhaps you can use "cunning".

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Did it. Thank you for helping. :D

Champion

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a year ago

Breumaster,

As Peter points out, guile is a noun. The adjective form of guile is guileful.
https://www.onelook.com/?w=guileful&ls=a&loc=home_ac_guile
Marked by skill in deception.

I agree with Peter that cunning may work better in your title.
https://www.onelook.com/?w=cunning&ls=a&loc=home_ac_cunning
Someone who is cunning uses their intelligence to get what they want, especially by tricking or cheating people.

Please use 80s instead of 80's. 80s refers to the decade; 80's is the possessive form of 80.

Please consider one of these two alternatives to your current title:
The Most Crafty & Guileful Shakespeare Villain After the 80s
or
The Most Crafty & Cunning Shakespeare Villain After the 80s

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Hi, Dan. That happens, when bad vocabulary meets bad grammar. ;)
I corrected the fail. Took the second version. It seems to be the best form, intuitively.

Champion

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Breumaster,

Thank you for updating the title of the list. I updated the title of this thread to match.

Thank you Peter, for suggesting the word cunning.

Your English is good enough that I sometime forget that English is a second language.  I shudder to think how well I would do in this forum if the native language were German.

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Thank you for the kind words. I feel more safe now after writing more than a year in this forum. That helped me at the job last time. My fellas don't speak english so well, so I had to translate. It was really fun, even though it was sometimes a little hard to grab some vocabulary of my brain. :D

It was very funny, because I had to talk to a french man, which also had a gaped english. So it was something between english, gesture and pointing conversation. But we reached the goal and had a good contact. Nice!

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5 months ago

Anyone?

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4 months ago

I consider this as ready to go online!

Champion

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4 months ago

Good poll, Breu! I'd probably vote for Claudius  for a few reasons, including that Derek Jacobi's performance is so good that it makes Claudius' narcissism as unsettling as it should be. Yuck. : )

May I suggest a few edits to the intro? (below in bold)

In movies based on Shakespeare's literature, there are mostly abyssmally bad-minded villains driving the plot. Shakespeare painted the human world in black & white. In Shakespeare's dramas (I'm not sure what word you're looking for here but prioritively isn't a word) is the extreme position of good and bad you can find nowadays in many other movies made in a simpler style. But Shakespeare had a serious crush on the sense of words, which makes his dramas very unique, even nowadays. From these Shakespearean villains, who is the most nasty?

Oh, and I love this:
Tell me the bad deeds of your beloved Shakespeare villain here.

I also love "Shakespeare had a serious crush on words" (so true!) but I disagree that he painted humans in black and white. His literature wouldn't be so compelling and so relevant if that were true. There are all kinds of grey in the characters of Hamlet and King Lear, for example, which is what makes their struggles so resonant to human beings still. We can all see ourselves in those struggles between "the better angels of our nature" and the lesser parts of ourselves. He certainly drew some truly villainous characters and a few fairly innocent ones but I don't think that at all means that he drew people in black and white: I think he drew a lot of characters who existed in the grey or in the many colors of the moral rainbow.

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ruby:
I changed the text a little. Thank you for correcting. Please look at it - I think it's ok now. If there are further changes in need, I'll do them. :D

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ruby:
What do think about it? :D

Champion

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4 months ago

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Thank you, Jessica. :D
Thank you guys.
I'm a little late, but had a 14 hour day. ;)